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Arteries, Veins, Capillaries and The Heart

Jan 12, 2012 > Biology
The blood away which carry the bright red oxygenated blood away from the heart are called arteries. The large arteries, which receive the blood directly from form the heart, branch repeatedly until every part of the body is served by one or more of them.

The blood returns from all parts of the body to the heart through veins. There are many more veins than arteries throughout the body. The veins gradually unite to form larger veins as they approach the heart.

When the blood is sent out over the body through the arteries it passes into the capillaries in which the arteries end. The capillaries are tiny hairlike blood vessels forming a network throughout the body. The tissue is so well supplied with capillaries that even a pinprick is likely yo break some of them and result in the appearance of a few drops of blood.

When an artery, vein, or capillary is broken or cut, blood flows the broken vessels. Usually the blood flow the broken blood vessels is stopped by the formation of a clot in the end of the broken vessels. Bleeding from a large artery comes in serious. The blood from a served artery is extremely serious. The blood from a served artery comes in spurts. There is a smooth flow of blood from veins.

The Heart

Arteries, Veins, Capillaries and The Heart The pumping action of the heart ceases only with death. Ay and night, year after year, it continues to work in pumping the blood throughout the body. It can rest only by pumping more slowly or less powerfully.

The heart is a hollow, pear-shaped muscular organ located just slightly to the left of the midline of the body in the chest cavity. It can be located easily by the sound of the heartbeat or the feeling of its contraction through the skin and muscle that lie over it.

At birth the heart beats about 130 times a minute, at six years it beats 100 times a minute, at ten years about 90, and at fifteen years about 85. The approximate normal heart rate among adults ranges from 65 to 80 betas per minute. During a lifetime the heart beats 2,500,000,000 times and pumps a total of nearly 15,000,000 gallons.

The impulse which causes the heart to contract develops in some nerve tissue which is called the peacemaker of the heart. An attempt to measure this impulse indicates that its energy is the equivalent of one-thousandth of a volt.

The blood from all parts of the body empties into the heart through large veins. Then it is sent through the lungs, where it acquires a new supply of oxygen. The blood the returns to the heart from the lungs. When the heart muscle contracts, the blood is forced out the heart, then goes by away of the large arteries and capillaries to the farthest extremes of the body.

The heart moves a total of five hundred gallons of blood a day. Since there are about six quarts of blood in the whole body, the heart moves the same fluid, slightly modified chemically as it travels about, over and over again

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